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  Click here to go to the first staff post in this thread.   Thread: Front squat/ squat

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    Default Front squat/ squat

    Last edited by Fadi; 10-10-2009 at 11:55 PM.
    1984 Age 18, BW 73kg: FS195kg, BS200kg, 162.5 3x10, PC 140kg, C&J 160kg. 1987 Age 22, BW 77kg BS 130kg x20, 120kg x50.





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    Fadi do you know, that is exactly how I squat, in all 3 cases, and each time i have, people have told me not to lean forward at all, and to keep my back completely straight up vertical throughout the whole movement, it is nearly impossible to do so! and as for the levels to squat to, i have been told to squat so that my ass nearly touches the ground, there is a guy at our gym who can squat with his bottom only centimetres off the ground so apparently everyone is expected to squat like that. Thanks for that diagram, now I know i was doing it right! As for stance, i used to do legs just over shoulder width apart with feet slightly (and I mean only slightly) face away from each other, and this apparently was wrong too and several people at the gym told me to stand with them facing wider out more or completely straight to the mirror, which i found only added pressure to my left knee. what is your take on foot positioning?


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    Rule of thumb I work by is bar should always be over the centre of your foot as per the diagram. If that means you sit the bar higher up or further back doesnt matter. Its the only way youll stay balanced enough to squat properly.


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    Bar position and stance width are all personal perference. Oly lifter tend to have the bar higher and have narrow stance, powerlifters have very wide stance and bar further down the back. More than 1 way to skin a cat.
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    Do the person's physique and proportions make a difference, Nick? I mean like a fat guy vs a skinny guy, someone long-legged vs short-legged, etc? If so, what are so common examples?
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    Not as far as I know in term of bar position or stance Kyle. As I said it tends to be more what style of lifting you're involved in.
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    Leverages play a role in lean, as does flexibility. But like Nick said, stance and bar position are up to the lifter.

    I use stance to target different areas. A wide stance box squat hits the hips hard. Close stance box squat hits the lower back.

    If a guy is leaning too far forward, lower the bar a little further down.

    Remember, we dont learn how to squat, we forget, check out a toddler.


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    I know! My son squats all the time, good form too! I was saying that to my partner recently actually.

    I feel that my physique seems to work well with squats. I have short legs and a longer torso. I find deadlifts to be a bit harder for me.


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    PTC that is true we forget how to squat. i am with you there too josh, i find squats to be great, but dead lifts (unless it is stiff legged dead lifts which i love) i struggle with. but i have longer legs and a shorter torso. PTC when you say closer stance hits the hips, is that a good area to try and train?


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    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle Aaron View Post
    Do the person's physique and proportions make a difference, Nick? I mean like a fat guy vs a skinny guy, someone long-legged vs short-legged, etc? If so, what are so common examples?
    Kyle, if a person has a long femur/long leg and a short torso, you're going to see him employing more tilting forward as in the 3rd drawing. Not necessarily placing the bar on his lower trapezius muscles, but he'll more than likely be leaning forward nonetheless. To someone like me (at 164cm) who can squat without needing to lean so much forward; that lifter may look "wrong". It's not wrong as long the centre line has not been deviated from and the lifter maintains a straight back (although to others he may look as he's bending too much forward.

    As long as the centre line of gravity is maintained and there's no rounding/arching of the back or lifting of the heels, then lifters will always lift differently based on their physical structure.

    It's also essential to be aware of the block or fortress as I like to call it, which has to be created before attempting the slightest move and maintained throughout it. Filling the lungs with air supports the rib cage and prevents the chest/upper body area from collapsing forward. Also, the abdominal muscles would have to be contracted, which in turn goes towards increasing the intra-abdominal pressure which then helps in preventing the torso from collapsing forward also. Last but not least is tightening of the lumber muscles of the back which go towards positioning the spinal column in extension. That’s the fortress.


    Fadi.
    Last edited by Fadi; 07-10-2009 at 08:04 PM.
    1984 Age 18, BW 73kg: FS195kg, BS200kg, 162.5 3x10, PC 140kg, C&J 160kg. 1987 Age 22, BW 77kg BS 130kg x20, 120kg x50.


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