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Christian
16-06-2010, 08:12 PM
Got a massage to day granted it was from a student in teaching at my college as im a broke bastard. But was still better then nothing.

Brought up an issue with me that i have suspected for some time, scholiosis. Basically 1 shoulder sits higher then the other if i do the upright row movement 1 arm and shoulder sits higher then the other buy a good few inches no matter how hard i try to keep them balanced.

What can be done? Should i be looking at an osteopath, chiro im not sue who deals specifically with this disorder. Also should i switch to dumbells for a while and possibly add extra weight to the lacking side to build it up? My back is disproportionate in muscle size.

Is anyone else affected by this?

Thanks

Looks to dave for advice? (vitamin c wont help this one :p)

http://www.optimalfamilychiropracticllc.com/images/scoliosis2.gif

dave
16-06-2010, 08:20 PM
I suggest Vitamin C 300000000000000000000mg an hour. :D :D :D

Noobs it is less likely to be scoliosis (a trainee masseuse is not even close to being taught how to diagnose this, even I am not and I have tons of training on top of them) than a dropped shoulder due to hanging a bag on one shoulder, sitting badly at the computer and just having plain poor posture. I would go to your GP ask them for their advice and get an xray of your spine. Then you they can make a diagnosis and you can go from there. Even if a minor scoliotic curve has developed due to your posture then it is treatable as it is just a functional issue. It could be a limb length issue as well which is easy to check (measure from your greater trochanter to lateral malleolus. To find your greater trochanter place your hand on your hip and you are looking for the bony point that moves when you rotate your leg)

Go check out this video (http://www.iscoliosis.com/video.html?reload=main&filename=featurestories-selftest&videocookie=.wmv) and get your GF to do the test.

Christian
16-06-2010, 08:23 PM
I suggest Vitamin C 300000000000000000000mg an hour. :D :D :D

Noobs it is less likely to be scoliosis (a trainee masseuse is not even close to being taught how to diagnose this, even I am not and I have tons of training on top of them) than a dropped shoulder due to hanging a bag on one shoulder, sitting badly at the computer and just having plain poor posture. I would go to your GP ask them for their advice and get an xray of your spine. Then you they can make a diagnosis and you can go from there. Even if a minor scoliotic curve has developed due to your posture then it is treatable as it is just a functional issue.

Ok thank mate, The main reason i thought this is because my neck is actually crooked and my head sits crooked on top of that (if that makes sense).

The thing is i always wore and still wear bags on my left shoulder it is the right that is dipped..

Xrays :rolleyes: that i can use viamin c for lol...

dave
16-06-2010, 08:31 PM
Read again I added more info for you.

Christian
16-06-2010, 09:36 PM
vid not wokring for me :(

Kyle Aaron
16-06-2010, 10:09 PM
Scoliosis, like increased kyphosis, or increased/decreased lordosis, is of two kinds: structural, and functional. When structural, there's something going on with the spine itself, the person was born that way, or has one leg shorter than the other, etc. With functional, it's the muscles, and it's something in their lifestyle, an affected posture, whatever.

If it's structural then exercise and stretches can lessen the effects and stop it getting worse, but cannot cure it. If functional, since it's entirely muscular then exercises and stretches can resolve it almost completely.

A small functional scoliosis is relatively common, if only because people are right or left-handed, so they tend to lift day-to-day more with one side than the other. So the muscles on one side get stronger and pull the spine to one side. A structural scoliosis is much rarer.

Usually the difference is easily seen by the person with a bare back bending over. If the curve is still there when they bend, it's structural; if it disappears, it's functional. But only a professional will know for sure.

Knock on over to a sport physiotherapist and see what they say. They will suggest exercises and stretches, and will tell you if any of your regular weight training is contraindicated.

Tall_Tim
16-06-2010, 11:50 PM
My sis had scoliosis. She was diagnosed with at at 15 and wore a brace to school and had to give up her ballet, cheerleeding and running because of it. It pushed most of the muscles in her lower back to one side giving her an awful slant in her shoulders and compacting her ribs so badly on her right side that it was going to restrict her lung capacity if it progressed as she grew.

At 18 she was told the brace would no longer be of help and an operation had to be performed in a year before serious problems occurred. Basically they broke her spine in about 17 places (they had fused due to compacting vertebrae over several years) and inserted metal rods to straighten her up. Her case was pretty bad because she had not one but two severe un-natural curves in her spine. Had to cope with months of pain while bedridden and still unable to do most things. She dances again now, but cant do a lot of the things the used to due to not having full movement in her back because of the rods.
Because her case was particularly bad she was not given any exercises as they were of no help in straightening her spine. Only the brace to try and guide her spine into place as she grew. No amount of stretching or massages were going to curb fusing vertabrae, nor loosen the muscles in her back (her right side of her lower back was basically one big knot)

Not many people have a "perfect" spine and most of us have a slight curve (outside of the natural one) but not bad enough to effect our everyday activity.

What can be done? Seeing as your an adult n00bs a brace wont do anything for you because your body has already grown and "set" in place. If its bad enough, they may tell you an operation is the only option (unless you choose to live with it) and sorry to say - it aint cheap. $7500 for my sisters one being in a private health fund. Seeing as the anesthetist wanted $600 per hour to keep her under in an 8 1/2 hours operation + the rest of the surgeons and drugs, physio and treatment) its just as well she still lives at home with mum and dad. Im not trying to be the bringer of bad news or worry you, just give the facts straight up.

Hopefully your case is not severe and you don't have to put up with the time off work/study, training and the huge costs and pain of the operation. Speak to a GP and get the x-rays (if they cant do anything they will refer you to a specialist).

Kyle Aaron
17-06-2010, 12:03 AM
Tim, I think if n00b's scoliosis were severe enough to require surgery, he would have noticed it himself by now. I didn't require surgery, but figured out something was wrong by about age 7. n00bs is a bit overexcitable about the latest greatest shiniest food fads, but he's not stupid.

See a sports physio, n00bs.

Tall_Tim
17-06-2010, 12:47 AM
Tim, I think if n00b's scoliosis were severe enough to require surgery, he would have noticed it himself by now. I didn't require surgery, but figured out something was wrong by about age 7. n00bs is a bit overexcitable about the latest greatest shiniest food fads, but he's not stupid.

See a sports physio, n00bs.

Fair comment, and looking back at my previous post if I implied in anyway way n00bs wasnt intelligent I apologise because that not what I was trying to say. I was only explaining what happened in my family. Back on topic though, how often do you get a look at your back? My sis had it for years before noticing. It was severely bent (with both bends) when diagnosed. Plenty of adults have had to have the procedure done. Some dont notice until too late, some cant afford it due to studies, home loans etc, and some have very long waits before the procedure can be done regardless of whether they are in a health fund or relying on the public system.

Christian
17-06-2010, 12:50 AM
Fair comment, and looking back at my previous post if I implied in anyway way n00bs wasnt intelligent I apologise because that not what I was trying to say. I was only explaining what happened in my family. Back on topic though, how often do you get a look at your back? My sis had it for years before noticing. It was severely bent (with both bends) when diagnosed. Plenty of adults have had to have the procedure done. Some dont notice until too late, some cant afford it due to studies, home loans etc, and some have very long waits before the procedure can be done regardless of whether they are in a health fund or relying on the public system.

I didnt take offence mate. There wasnt anything offensive there.

I only noticed it after i started tkaing photos of my body when i first got interested in changing my lifestyle... Then after a fewmonths of doing it i noticed my right sohulder was always lower thenmy left and now naturally i notice it because i am aware..
I noticed my leg being not straight in the lift of my building...

I will have to see someone.. as it cantbe good to put 200kg onto a back that isnt sittign right..

Also on my pulls 1 side is stronger and locks out easier..

If i do an upright row my arms are on totally different angles...

dave
17-06-2010, 01:19 AM
I noticed my leg being not straight in the lift of my building..

Whats that?

Christian
17-06-2010, 01:29 AM
Whats that?

**** i dno what i typed im retarded..

I meant to say my neck. it doesnt sit vertical on my body it kinks. and my head sit sontop of that kinked. Its weird

dave
17-06-2010, 01:35 AM
Your head is adjusted to sit properly due to what is going on below it, that means your spine adjusts for whats going on below it (cervical, thoracic and lumbar), your hips do the same, your knees, your ankles etc etc till you get to the ground. So you could have a leg length discrepancy that is tilting you pelvis to one side that is causing your lumbar spine to compensate and then causing the thoracic and cervical spine to compensate to keep your head straight and in a proper position. You could have a sagging hip due to a muscular weakness that is doing the same thing to the links above it. You could have tight muscles pulling on one side of your spine that is causing a muscloskeletal problem and leading to a problem. You could have a dropped shoulder due to bad posture that is affecting you cervical spine only. See there are lots of reasons (probably a lot more than I could think of). Get a physio or GP to work from the ground up to work out your issue.

Christian
17-06-2010, 03:39 AM
Your head is adjusted to sit properly due to what is going on below it, that means your spine adjusts for whats going on below it (cervical, thoracic and lumbar), your hips do the same, your knees, your ankles etc etc till you get to the ground. So you could have a leg length discrepancy that is tilting you pelvis to one side that is causing your lumbar spine to compensate and then causing the thoracic and cervical spine to compensate to keep your head straight and in a proper position. You could have a sagging hip due to a muscular weakness that is doing the same thing to the links above it. You could have tight muscles pulling on one side of your spine that is causing a muscloskeletal problem and leading to a problem. You could have a dropped shoulder due to bad posture that is affecting you cervical spine only. See there are lots of reasons (probably a lot more than I could think of). Get a physio or GP to work from the ground up to work out your issue.

Thanks mate, So its like dominos obviously...

Small problem somewhere can lead to a compunding effect. I will check it out the the doc on friday.

Much appreicated.

nick351
17-06-2010, 09:12 PM
My brother had severe scoliosis and kyphosis, and had to get titanium rods screwed to his spine last year, it just so happened that one of the bone fusions didnt hold and put pressure on that particular spot and snapped one of the rods - yes a 6mm thick titanium rod. And had to do the surgery again 2 months ago.

The type of doctor that specialises in this condition is an Orthopaedic Surgeon/Doctor. But yes I agree to see a sports physio first.

Christian
17-06-2010, 09:17 PM
Will do just need to save the money to do that..

Between blood tests not covered by medicare and endocronoligst and other drs apppintments it gets expensive..

dave
17-06-2010, 09:37 PM
Noobs if you do even have scoliosis it will not be operation worthy so do not worry no surgery for you. Just go to a GP that is bulk billed and they can do it all for free for you.

Kyle Aaron
17-06-2010, 10:09 PM
Back on topic though, how often do you get a look at your back?
You don't have to look at it, you feel and see other bits. You see that the ribcage is narrower on one side than the other, that the obliques are less well-developed on one side than the other, that the erector spinae are better developed, one hip may be raised and a shoulder dropped, you get one side sore and tight and the other fine, and so on.

A child won't notice, an adult will. And someone deadlifting 200+kg will sure as sht figure it out, they'll notice it around the time they're lifting their bodyweight on the bar.

Again, if it's minor you mightn't notice. But if it's minor you won't need surgery, that's for major stuff.

Thus, if n00bs has a structural scoliosis rather than a functional one, he is very unlikely to require surgery. We've no need to scare him with that sort of talk.

Christian
18-06-2010, 12:03 AM
I always wondered why i loked down and my stomach petrude smore on the left hand side and my belly button is more to the right...

Im off to the doc tomorrow and will report back.